• GCES HERO DAD’S PROGRAM

     
    Welcome to the Hero Dad's Information page!!
     
    Who is a HERO DAD? YOU!!! We are trying to improve students over all academic achievement by encouraging positive male influence at school. Dad, Grandpa, Brother... anyone willing to take that extra step for your student is a HERO DAD. 
      

    Hero Dad’s is usually on Friday’s, but if there is a different day that works best for you, that’s okay too! It’s really simple, all you have to do is come to GCES at 7:10 a.m. when the school opens and help with drop off. You get to help open car doors, greet kids, and help pump them up with enthusiasm and get the excited for the school day. It makes a huge difference to the students, and it is a lot of fun too.  You are welcome to stay and help during school too, just make sure to call Nikki Wiens at 817-220-0272, you have to make sure you pass a background check to stay on campus during school hours.

     
     
    If you're wondering why we have such a program, then you're in the right place. Please take a few minutes to follow the links provided below.
     
     
    There are so many reason's why it is important to have Dad, Step Dad, Grandpa, Uncle, Foster Dad, Brother, a Male Family Member, or Family Friend involved in school.
     
    For example:
     

    What's Special About Fathers' Involvement?

    Research shows that students perform better academically, have fewer discipline problems, and become more responsible adults when their parents are actively involved in their learning. But, over the years, "parent involvement" often has meant "mothers' involvement." In schools, pre-schools and Head Start programs, and within the family itself, it has been assumed often that mothers have the primary responsibility for encouraging the children's learning and development. These assumptions miss the importance of fathers' involvement. In addition, the adverse effects of a father's absence on the development of his children are well documented. Nevertheless, over half of the children in the United States will spend part of their childhood in a single-parent home (Cherlin, 1992).

    Following are some areas in which fathers' involvement has significant effects on children.

    Modeling adult male behavior. Fathers demonstrate to their children that male adults can take responsibility, help to establish appropriate conduct, and provide a daily example of how to deal with life, how to dress, how to regulate closeness and distance, and the importance of achievement and productivity. If they have an active religious or spiritual life, fathers, like mothers, can serve as models in that area as well (Hoffman, 1971).

    Making choices. Children glean from their fathers a range of choices about everything from clothing to food to devotion to a great cause. This promotes positive moral values, conformity to rules and the development of conscience (Hoffman, 1971).

    Problem solving abilities. Research shows that even very young children who have experienced high father involvement show an increase in curiosity and in problem solving capacity. Fathers' involvement seems to encourage children's exploration of the world around them and confidence in their ability to solve problems (Pruett, 2000).

    Providing financial and emotional support. Economic support is one significant part of a father's influence on his children. Another is the concrete forms of emotional support that he gives to the children's mother. That support enhances the overall quality of the mother-child relationship, for example when dads ease moms' workloads by getting involved with the children's homework (Abramovitch in Lamb, 1997).

    Highly involved fathers also contribute to increased mental dexterity in children, increased empathy, less stereotyped sex-role beliefs and greater self-control. And when fathers are more actively involved, children are more likely to have solid marriages later in life. (Abramovitch in Lamb, 1997).


    Enhancing student performance.
     In families where both the father and the mother are highly involved with their children's school, the children enjoy several advantages.

     

    The presence of a responsible father promotes improves academic performance and reduces disciplinary problems among children.

    Preschoolers with actively involved fathers have stronger verbal skills.Children with actively involved fathers display less behavior problems in school.

    Girls with strong relationships with their fathers do better in mathematics.Boys with actively involved fathers tend to get better grades and perform better on achievement tests.

    Research shows that even very young children who have experienced high father involvement show an increase in curiosity and in problem solving capacity. Fathers’ involvement seems to encourage children’s exploration of the world around them and confidence in their ability to solve problems.

     

    Highly involved fathers also contribute to increased mental dexterity in children, increased empathy, less stereotyped sex role beliefs and greater self-control.

     

    When non-custodial fathers are highly involved with their children’s learning, the children are more likely to get A's at all grade levels.

     

    Nonresident father contact with children and involvement in their schools within the past year are associated with the same three factors: fathers paying child support; custodial mothers being more educated; and custodial homes not experiencing financial difficulties.

     

    High involvement at the early childhood level - frequency with which parents interact with their young children, such as how often they read, tell stories and sign and play with their children. These experiences contribute to children’s language and literacy development and transmit information and knowledge about people, places and things.


     
    The involvement of fathers in their children's schools is important for children's achievement and behavior. In two-parent households, fathers' involvement in their children's schools has a distinct and independent influence on children's achievement over and above that of mothers. These results show that fathers can be a positive force in their children's education, and when they do get involved, their children are likely to do better in school. Unfortunately, many fathers are relatively uninvolved in their children's schools (U.S. Department of Education, 1997). These results should encourage fathers to become more involved in their children's schools and encourage schools to welcome fathers' involvement.